This has some obvious drawbacks, such as it not always being clear what the pictures are trying to show.

The practical fact of the matter is that programs are in their own league, using what they call the “total immersion” approach.

Unlike other courses and programs that attempt to re-create this with a sea of indistinguishable phrases and confusing layouts, this program relies primarily on using the connections that your brain makes between pictures and words to its advantage.

A simple solution to this is to have a dictionary with you while you are learning, so you can run through the possible answers, but for the amount you’re paying for this course, it’s the sort of thing you really shouldn’t have to do.

There are no explanations for the pictures themselves, and no external information that helps you to understand any of the potentially more complex grammar aspects of learning a language.

While it is absolutely worth it if you are the sort of person for whom this kind of learning can work, I definitely advise trying it out before you buy.

Their website sometimes offers trial periods to use the software, or perhaps you know a friend who has purchased from them.

It certainly isn’t the kind of course that you pick up for a few weeks before you go on holiday; it is definitely the kind of program that you buy if you want to really immerse yourself in a language, and plan on using it in the long term. Yes, you can find countless positive (and negative) testimonies for this program, but the fact of the matter is that this is probably going to be a way of studying that you simply haven’t encountered before.

It is not particularly familiar, and it certainly isn’t something that you can just dive right into.

Amazon often knock a couple of hundred off this course, and you can get a very reasonable discount if you buy second hand.