A member of the Domestic Violence Network’s middle- and high-school Youth Network, De Leon plans activities to inform students about unsafe or unhealthy relationships.

She’s also a student leader with the “No More Club,” which seeks to end the silence on dating abuse.

“Ultimately, those patterns that we see in schoolhouses continue into adulthood …

Suggested questions for guiding a discussion are included. option=com_content&task=view&id=219&Itemid=129 Source: ETR RECAPP Website Target Audience: Level IV (adolescence, ages 15-18; high school) Topic: Romantic Relationships and Dating Duration of Lesson: 1 hour 20 minutes (Part I, 30 minutes; Part II, 50 minutes) Date Published: 2002 Summary: This learning activity is designed to help youth understand the risks of unprotected sex and learn about contraceptive options.

To view this lesson click here: Source: ETR Re CAPP Website, adapted from ETR’s Reducing The Risk Target Audience: Level III (early adolescence, ages 12 through 15; middle school/junior high school) and IV (adolescence, ages 15 through 18; high school) Duration of Lesson: 25 to 55 Minutes Date Published: 1999 Summary: In this participatory activity that focuses on postponing sexual activity, students observe the teacher demonstrate role-plays and students then practice delaying skills in role-play situations.

The educator then leads the students in a guided discussion about the activity.

“I think that’s lack of insight on the principals’ part,” Khubchandani argued, suggesting the principals are unwilling to acknowledge students’ role in helping their peers cope with and prevent dating abuse.

Maria De Leon, a senior at Crispus Attucks High School in Indianapolis, teaches her classmates about dating violence.Bob Farrace, the public-affairs director for the National Association of Secondary School Principals, said he encourages high-school principals to take an honest and transparent look at their own data, identify the trends in teen dating violence incidents, and address them appropriately.While he called the study’s findings “deeply troubling,” he said that dating abuse hasn’t been cited specifically by principals as an area of focus for the national organization, alluding to state policies that oversee teen dating violence training and education.Less than a third (30 percent) posted information on teen dating violence that was easily available and accessible to students—posted in hallways or the cafeteria, for example—and just 35 percent specifically addressed dating abuse in their school’s violence-prevention policies.Further, when principals were presented with several options and asked to identify the largest barrier to assisting student victims, the second most-common response—following lack of training—was that “dating violence is a minor issue compared with other student health issues we deal with.”According to Jagdish Khubchandani, the associate professor of health science at Ball State University and the study’s lead author, some school principals are hampered by faculty and staff without sufficient skills and training; others, meanwhile, mistakenly perceive dating violence as a typical, trivial teenage problem. Participants group into teams to resolve an assigned case study and present their solution to the entire group.