“Not only is there no intelligent connection between the word “presser” and its supposed meaning, this word already has a definition: a person or device that removes wrinkles. “Less than a week into the new year and it’s the most overused, meaningless word in the media,” said Ross. “Because I am tired of hearing swag to describe anything on the face of the planet.

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1171, which says, “Although the ‘price point’ of effective new drugs…may initially be out of reach for many patients…” “It has no ‘point.’ It is just a ‘price.’” – Guy Michael, Cherry Hill, N. “Usually used in a sentence explaining the ‘secret’ in excruciating public detail. “Whether it’s a ‘free gift’ (banished in 1988) or droopy clothing, this word is neither useful nor fancy.” – Jeff Drake, Saint Albans, West Va.

Is this a metaphor for business success based on the fast food industry? “It has become too frequent in business discussions. “An annoying bit of hyperbole about the latest saucy picture or controversy that is already becoming trite.” – Tim Bednall, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia “Meaning a post or video or whatever will have so much Internet traffic that it will ‘break the internet.’ It’s being used for every headline and video. “I hope the list doesn’t ‘break the internet.’ (How else would I read it next year)? “It seems as if every politician who makes a statement has to ‘walk it back,’ meaning retract the statement, or explain it in laborious detail to the extent that the statement no longer has any validity or meaning once it has been ‘walked back.’” – Max Hill, Killeen, Tex. Kenneth Ross of Glastonbury, Conn., and Bob Priddy of Jefferson City, Mo., were among many who saw this storming in last January. “The word has become so overused that it is not ‘swag’ to not use the word ‘swag.'” – Devin, Farwell, Mich.

“The term itself is stupid, and the campaign and petition written by men’s rights activists claiming that men need to take up more space due to their anatomy, and that anti-manspreading campaigns are ‘male-bashing,’ are ridiculous. If I was putting someone ‘before anything else,’ I would respect them enough to use their name.” — S. Also, the concept ‘before anybody else,’ developed AFTER the word became popular. “I’d rather be called ‘babe’ than ‘bae’ any day.” — Alexsis Outwater, Bronson, Mich. — Dawn Farrell, Kanata, Ont., Canada “Enough with the over-sensationalized words to describe weather! Prescott, Oshawa, Ont., Canada “I think most, if not all can agree that we would prefer to avoid the polar vortex in the future, both in name and in embodiment.” — Christine Brace, Westminster, Md. Louis Post-Dispatch editorializes about a ‘political vortex.'” “Suddenly things that once would have been called ‘tips’ are now being called ‘hacks.’ It can’t be because the one word is shorter or easier to say; and the actual accepted meanings of ‘hack’ have nothing to do with suggestions for doing tasks better or more efficiently — quite the opposite, really.” – Sharla Hulsey, Sac City, Iowa. What they really mean is ‘tip’ or ‘short cut,’ but clearly it is not a ‘hack,’ as it involves no legal or ethical impropriety or breach of security.” – Peter P. There are probably even hacking hacks.” – Chellsea Mastroine, Canton, Ohio. We already have a perfectly good word in ‘skills’ (ending with an s, not a z).” – Chip Lupo, Columbia, S. I’m kind of a sleepie.'” – Andy Poe, Marquette, Mich.

The problem is with people taking up too much space on the subway or any public mode of transportation. “Life hack, this hack, that hack…stop with the hacks! “I crave good sleep, too, but that does not make me a sleepie. Sounds like ‘foodie’ is a synonym for ‘everybody.’ Foodies around the world agree; let’s banish this term.” – Steve Szilagyi, Mason, Mich.

It is used by all parties in Canada’s Federal election. Van Helsing should be the only stake holder,” says Jeff Baenen of Minneapolis, Minn.

Now we are all encouraged to have a ‘conversation,’ and everything will somewhat be magically resolved.” “Over the past five years or so, this word has been increasingly used by talking heads on radio, television and in political circles to describe every form of verbal communication known to mankind. “Somewhere along the line, this word became a trendy replacement for ‘that is a problem.’ I just hate it.” – Sharon Martin, Hagerstown, Md.

“I would definitely like to kick some cans of the human variety every time I hear politicians use this phrase to describe a circumstance that hasn’t gone their way.” Christine Tomassini, Livonia, Mich. “Over-used within the last year or so in politics.” John Gates, Cumberland, Maine “Better nip this in the bud – it’s already morphed into ‘quadruple down.'” Marc Ponto, Milwaukee, Wisc.

“Much the same as ‘put on the back burner,’ these two phrases still have heat and are still in the road. Raczko, Swanton, Ohio “I can’t turn on the TV any more without being informed that can-kicking has occurred. ” Kathryn, West Chester, Ohio “This blackjack term is now used as a verb in place of ‘repeat’ or ‘reaffirm’ or ‘reiterate.’ Yet, it adds nothing. “It implies supernatural powers — such as the ability to change the weather or levitate.

How many times do we need to hear ‘fiscal cliff,’ let alone its definition? “Usually used in politics, this typically means that someone or some group is neglecting its responsibilities. “I thought that perhaps you weren’t ready to deal with it.

This was seized upon during the current administration and is used as a cliché by all parties…Republicans, Democrats, Independents, Libertarians, Tories, Whigs, Socialists, Communists, Fashionistas…” Mike Cloran, Cincinnati, Ohio “I’m surprised it wasn’t on your 2012 list — were you just kicking the, um, phrase down the road to 2013? You just kicked that can down the road.” Rebecca Martz, Houston, Tex. “The next time I see or hear the phrase, I am going to double over.” Tony Reed, Holland, Mich.

“A pretentious way of saying ‘selected.’ It’s enormously overused.” – Kristi Hoerauf, San Francisco, Calif. K., ‘takeaway’ food is known as ‘to go’ here in the Colonies. “Purely with reference to a specific teams’ fans, this word needs to go. “Let’s just keep with ‘shake yer booty’ — no need to ‘twerk’ it! “Come on down, we’re havin’ car-ageddon, wine-ageddon, budget-ageddon, a sale-ageddon, flower-ageddon, and so-on-and-so-forth-ageddon!