It seems like everyone's looking for love online ... A few short years ago, we had to put some actual effort into dating and finding love. We connected with friends and headed out on the town/to the bar/to the game.

psychological reasons for online dating-25

According to the study findings, the most common place to meet a spouse is at work or at school (38 percent).

"Through a friend or family member" came in second (27 percent), while "on an online dating site" came in third (17 percent) — hardly the "35 percent of Americans" as claimed in the earlier study.

Where are the questions about environment, economic conditions, and outside influences?

(Example: Long-standing research shows that when couples encounter stress or unexpected demands on their energy, their satisfaction with their relationship declines, often leading to breakup or divorce.)Why don't these dating sites take critical happenings, variables and milestones into account when evaluating compatibility — money management, financial strain, losing a job, illness, death of a parent, moving, raising kids (not "do you want kids," but rather, asking questions about parenting style and actually raising kids)?

Normally, this would be a great thing, as technology makes things better.

But when it comes to love, all technology does is leave a wake of emotional destruction, disconnection, and false positives.Of course, there are online dating success stories.Everyone seems to know someone who knows someone who is getting married to their online sweetheart.highlights how Tinder has signaled a “dating apocalypse” because it doesn’t promote actual “dating” — it promotes hookups based on physical appearance.In a nutshell: Swiping right strokes the ego of the recipient, and paves the way to sex-on-demand.But with the advent of technology, "dating" doesn't exist anymore.