Parveen's son, for example, went to an unregistered madrassa.

Madrassas are funded by wealthy business people, religious political parties and even donors from other countries, such as Saudi Arabia.

He also doesn't want his name used because he too has survived suicide bombings due to his stance on militants. A tally of cases reported in newspapers over the past 10 years of sexual abuse by maulvis or clerics and other religious officials came to 359.

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Als ze zich ongegeneerd gaat zitten vingeren waar de directeur bij is gaat het al snel over in een geile neukpartij.

Sexual abuse is a pervasive and longstanding problem at madrassas in Pakistan. And cases rarely make it past the courts, because Pakistan's legal system allows the victim's family to "forgive" the offender and accept what is often referred to as "blood money." The AP found hundreds of cases of sexual abuse by clerics reported in the past decade, and officials suspect there are many more within a far-reaching system that teaches at least 2 million children in Pakistan.

In the blistering heat of late April, in the grimy two-room Islamic madrassa, he awoke one night to find his teacher lying beside him. He compares the situation to the abuse of children by priests in the Catholic Church.

But in a culture where clerics are powerful and sexual abuse is a taboo subject, it is seldom discussed or even acknowledged in public. Police are often paid off not to pursue justice against clerics, victims' families say.

"I am not sure what it will take to expose the extent of it.

It's very dangerous to even try." His assessment was echoed by another senior official, a former minister who says sexual abuse in madrassas happens all the time.Carola moet bij de directeur komen van de universiteit. Ze wordt zo geil dat ze al haar geil over zijn voeten heen squirt. Als ze na een leuke avond uitgaan zin in sex hebben besluiten ze samen een jongen uit de disco mee naar huis te nemen. Ze vraagt hem of ze ook haar sexdiploma kan halen bij hem.. Among the weapons they use to frighten their critics is a controversial blasphemy law that carries a death penalty in the case of a conviction."This is not a small thing here in Pakistan — I am scared of them and what they can do," the official says.The Interior Ministry, which oversees madrassas, refused repeated written and telephone requests for an interview.