For example, if we randomly assigned people in the U. to their marriage partners, we would expect 44% of marriages to be between two people of different races.

interracial dating survey results-2

For example, socio-geographic segregation between the races might explain dating segregation if people date others who are like them in terms of income, education—or simply people who live in the same geographic area.

Dating trials tell us that if we removed these barriers to interracial relationships, same-race preferences in dating would ensure that interracial marriage would continue to be rare.

Unsurprisingly, most “yes’s” go unanswered, but there are patterns: For example, Asian women responded to white men who “yessed” them 7.8% of the time, more often than they responded to any other race.

On the other hand, white men responded to black women 8.5% of the time—less often than for white, Latino, or Asian women.

The same result is found for a measure of shared interests.

Participants in the study that came from racially intolerant places show a stronger same-race preference then people who come from a tolerant place.

For example, a participant from a low-tolerance state such as South Carolina (where 28% of those surveyed feel that interracial marriage should be banned) has same-race preferences that are 16% points higher than participant from a state such as New York (where 22% feel that interracial marriage should be banned). are the lowest in the country; in 2007 only 33% of black women were married.

Also, familiarly with a particular race does not increase an individual’s willingness to date someone of that race, the greater the share of the home population that is that race the less a participant was willing to date them. This marriage-gap has been explained by high incarceration rates among black men, reducing their income and marriage prospects for the future, and the growing divide in education rates between black women and black men.

White women also have a same-race preference but men, regardless of race, exhibit no preference for a partner of their same race.

This suggests that if preferences are driving the lack of interracial couples in the U. that outcome comes from the choices made by women and not by men.

You can accept or reject potential partners, and that information is used to determine your preferences for a mate without relying on surveys.