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However, a distinguishing feature of the Stanier design was the pronounced slope to the top of their side-tanks and tapered boiler in contrast to the parallel boiler of the Fowler 2-6-2Ts.

(Above) No 40018 departs from Millersdale on the push-pull shuttle service to Buxton on 16th August 1950.

After nationalisation in 1948, the newly-formed British Railways tried out a number of liveries with a view to adopting a future standard for its express-passenger engines of Class 8 power classification (dark blue) and for its fleet of express-passenger locomotives with a lower tractive effort (light green).

Eventually a lighter shade of blue was chosen for its large express locos, which included the Peppercorn and Gresley Pacifics of the Eastern and North Eastern Regions, the ex-SR 'Merchant Navy' Pacifics of the Southern Region, the ex-GWR 'King' class 4-6-0s for the Western Region and Stanier's ex-LMSR Pacifics.

During BR days the Class 2P continued to operate on the Scottish Region, principally around Kilmarnock.

Some tenty years after its introduction in September 1931, No 40647 heads a local train at Ayr on 27th July 1951. Note the Fowler flat sided tender which differed from the earlier Midland tender with coal rails as seen attached to 40491 above.(Above-Inset-Below) Listed among the engines in my Ian Allan abc Locospotters Book (1958-59 winter edition) are 33 'Compound' Class 4P 4-4-0s Nos 40907-41193, albeit the sequence of numbers reveal ominous gaps due to scrapping.

By the summer of 1960 only four remained in BR stock: No 40907 at Millhouses (Sheffield), at Manningham (Bradford) and the remaining two at Monument Lane (Birmingham).

(Above) This once popular and highly efficient class produced some splendid performances during the earlier years of grouping on the Birmingham two-hour expresses from Euston, and also duties in Scotland on the former Caledonian Railway and G&SWR main lines.

Both classes were identical in many respects; the Stanier engines had the same 5ft 3in driving wheels, 3ft 3½ins pony wheels and trailing wheels, identical sized cylinders at 17½in X 26ins, the same 21,485lb tractive effort, 200 in.

boiler pressure, 3 ton coal capacity, 1,500 gallons of water and 41ft 11¾ins length over buffers.

Out of the original 138 members built, no fewer than 134 were still listed in my abc, but only just..the onset of dieselisation they were diminishing fast and all had gone by the end of 1962.