I'm a 23 year old female, have a dog,so you must love dogs, i'm on going to Fond Du lac college in Cloquet to become a police officer .

Naeem managed a restaurant in midtown and later helped run a construction firm. We tried to be the guy you wanted to go out for a drink with. “I felt strongly that we should go, and not ask for the witnesses to come to Algiers. They told her that Cheibani had spoken freely about his crime, and that they had found parts of Bultemeier’s vehicle—a bumper, a luggage rack—in a search of his house. Ahmad arranged for the policemen to come to Brooklyn and appear before a federal grand jury, and in June, 2013, the jury returned a sealed indictment. He looked much older than his photos, like he’d led a hard life. The mosque I went to as a kid was in Queens, and it drew people from all over Brooklyn, Long Island, the Bronx—cabdrivers, truck drivers, regular working-class people. When I look at these Brooklyn juries, I see the people I grew up around.”Ahmad lives downtown, in an apartment that looks out on East Fourteenth Street. She’s an elegant woman, who had worked as a computer programmer at an insurance company in midtown for many years. It was dark, but it was like she was sunny—I can’t think of a better word for it.

His boss, who eventually became his partner, was a Hindu from India. “But if there was a war between India and Pakistan we didn’t bring it home. We’re the supplicants here.” The daughter turned out to be helpful, and Ahmad put her on the list of witnesses to be flown to Brooklyn. A few months later, when the French Army reported capturing Cheibani, Ahmad was uncertain that it was really him. But, she said, “We had his biometrics, from his Bamako arrest. It was one of the most moving moments I’ve felt doing this work.”I had heard from several people that Ahmad has a great rapport with juries. We were back at the Cadman Plaza diner—which, I’d learned, Brooklyn prosecutors call the Perp Diner. She loves New York, and steps lightly through the swelter of an East Village sidewalk. You see that light, and you want to get near it.”After hours, Ahmad likes to sing karaoke at a joint on Avenue A.

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For the hearing, she brought in seventeen witnesses from Niger and Mali, few of whom were prepared for a New York winter. “We were all frantically scraping up coats, hats, shoes. But the hardest part of bringing a terrorism suspect onto American soil, she says, has usually been convincing the U. C.—and from the National Security Council, in the White House.

We came this close to putting a woman on the stand in a yellow hat .” At the hearing, in the marble and mahogany grandeur of a Brooklyn federal courtroom, Cheibani was presumably astonished to see seventeen Africans ready to testify against him. But a lot of people are in it for the money, and his knowledge of the Sahel has been very valuable to A. The political opposition to such transfers has been entrenched for years on Capitol Hill, and has only intensified since the attempt to put Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the alleged mastermind of the 9/11 attacks, on trial in Manhattan federal court.

“When there’s a bank robbery, we try to solve the crime,” Ahmad said. If we lost a major extraterritorial case, there might never be another chance.”Ahmad had a multifaceted upbringing. She found another eyewitness, a one-legged beggar called Toto, who was still working outside La Cloche, the restaurant where Bultemeier had eaten his last meal. Though she lives alone, and travels constantly, she manages a busy, even glittering social life.

“But nobody thinks our job is to stamp out bank robbery. People expect us to prevent it.” Many terror cases are difficult to make, with the strongest evidence often classified or inadmissible. She grew up in suburban Nassau County, Long Island, with her father and stepmother and two younger brothers, and she also lived part time with her mother, in Manhattan. ’ I was always so glad to get home.”“We felt comfortable here,” Naeem told me, when I visited him and his wife, Nasrin, at their home, in East Meadow. I don’t care what other people do.”Naeem and his first wife, Jamile, left Pakistan for Canada in the nineteen-seventies—for economic reasons, he said. special agent, who has completed several tours in Pakistan and is now based in Philadelphia, told me, “If there’s a way to legally establish venue, the E. The original eyewitness, the security guard, had long vanished and was presumed dead. “He was petrified,” she said, but ultimately agreed to testify. “Zainab has a wider range of people she’s close to than the rest of us do,” a friend of hers, a freelance writer, told me.

Police officers know which questions to ask — and listen carefully to the answers.

Police officers don’t shy away from confrontation; they deal with it. Your friends may tease you about handcuffs and strip searches — and you probably won’t mind. Your date will know both the hidden gems and places to avoid in the neighborhoods he/she is assigned to. To excel at the job, a police officer’s personal integrity is an important quality. Your date should be a good driver — and probably knows all the traffic laws (and loopholes) in the area. Your date is trying to make the world — or at least the neighborhood — a better place.

“This is no way to fight a war,” the three senators and a group of their colleagues wrote, in a 2015 letter to Eric Holder, then the Attorney General. Attorney’s office would be most effective on this case? “I’ve never seen anybody work that many hours,” she said. We worked Saturdays, Sundays.” Celia Cohen, one of Ahmad’s co-counsels on that case, lives in New Jersey and has two young children, but she moved into Ahmad’s apartment in Manhattan for three weeks during the trial. This process can involve a great many sign-offs—delicate, overlapping negotiations prone to being buffeted by political and bureaucratic winds.