The objective of this sort of game is to slay monsters, explore a fantasy world, complete quests, go on adventures, create a story by roleplaying, and advance the created character.

reportedly under pressure from Compu Serve, to whom Richard Bartle had licensed the game.

This left MIST, a derivative of MUD1 with similar gameplay, as the only remaining MUD running on the Essex University network, becoming one of the first of its kind to attain broad popularity.

NEEDLE-TIME RIGHTS These rights protect recording artists; singers, backing vocalists and studio producers.

The mentioned could have assisted with recording the music, but may have not produced, composed or written the song.

He named the game MUD (Multi-User Dungeon), in tribute to the Dungeon variant of Zork, which Trubshaw had greatly enjoyed playing.

MUD, better known as Essex MUD and MUD1 in later years, ran on the Essex University network, and became more widely accessible when a guest account was set up that allowed users on JANET (a British academic X.25 computer network) to connect on weekends and between the hours of 2 AM and 8 AM on weekdays.

MUDs combine elements of role-playing games, hack and slash, player versus player, interactive fiction, and online chat.

Players can read or view descriptions of rooms, objects, other players, non-player characters, and actions performed in the virtual world.

PLATO MUDs are often ignored by historians and by the creators of other MUDs whose work came later.

Inspired by Adventure, a group of students at MIT in the summer of 1977 wrote a game for the PDP-10 minicomputer; called Zork, it became quite popular on the ARPANET.

They earn royalties when the song is played in public e.g.