In addition, if you opt to extend your repayment term, you could pay back more in interest over time.

If you want the stability of a fixed-rate loan with steady payments, consolidating can help.

Switching to a fixed-rate loan may give you a slightly higher interest rate, but it will remain the same for the duration of your loan.

Here are three situations when consolidating your student loans might make sense for you: 1. If you’re struggling to make your payments under a 10-year, Standard Repayment Plan, consolidation can help reduce your monthly payments.

When you take out a Direct Consolidation Loan, you can extend your repayment term to up to 30 years and get a smaller payment.

While the terms are sometimes used interchangeably, consolidating your loans is different than refinancing them.

Because the interest rate is a weighted average, rounded up, consolidation is unlikely to save you money.

By taking out a Direct Consolidation Loan, you can minimize the stress of your debt while retaining your federal loan benefits.

Often, Direct Consolidation is required in order to enroll in federal programs such as income-based repayment.

Debt, Direct Loan Consolidation, Featured, Federal Student Loan Refinancing, Private Student Loan Consolidation, Private Student Loan Refinancing, Student Loan Consolidation, Student Loan Consolidation Advice If you’re feeling overwhelmed by your student loans, you can take comfort in the fact that you’re not alone: Over 44 million Americans have student loan debt today.

You might have a mix of both federal and private loans and have several different loan servicers.

While extending your payment term can make your payments more manageable, keep in mind you’ll pay more in interest over the length of the loan. You want to qualify for an income-driven repayment plan.