Avid chief executive Rob Segal and president James Millership apologized for the security vulnerabilities that divulged the personal information.

They have plans to spend millions to improve security, and they’re also looking at payment options that offer more privacy.

Based on Ashley Madison's marketing and my own preconceived notions of marital infidelity largely gleaned from Hollywood, I thought the experience might have at least a hint of glamour and danger.

But instead, it felt desperate and the opposite of sexy.

And I couldn't believe how easy — and depressing — it was.

In case you didn't follow the hack, it exposed the data of 32 million Ashley Madison users.

While over 20 million male customers had checked their inboxes at least once, only 1,492 women had, Newitz found.

The site had apparently created its first fembot—Sensuous Kitten—as early as 2002.

In the same month, the company changed its signature tagline from "Life is Short.

Have an Affair." to "Find your moment," and updated its brand imagery to replace the image of a woman wearing a wedding ring with a red gem-shaped symbol as its logo.

Former chief executive Noel Biderman stepped down after the leak.

Since then, the new executives have been trying to revive the brand.

Have an affair." The company received attention on July 15, 2015, after hackers stole all of its customer data—including emails, names, home addresses, sexual fantasies and credit card information—and threatened to post the data online if Ashley Madison and fellow Avid Life Media site Established were not permanently closed.